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Projects2012

As we begin projects, they will be listed below this page.  You will be working in teams for each project, will be maintaining a team website, and other required tasks.  See the respective project page for more specific details.

Be creative, inventive, and learn your information well!  

Project 5 - Knock Us Out!

posted Feb 14, 2013, 10:54 AM by Michael Reilly   [ updated Mar 1, 2013, 9:26 AM ]

When you're in a group, it's a matter of joined forces, compromise, and you can't fully show your stuff.  Now it's time!

You will be working individually on the subject of your choice, either Language Arts or Science, and the choice of your expression!  In other words, knock us out with your brilliance!

You must use the current science or language arts topic.  You could also do neither, just some cool tech thing, IF your average in BOTH Science and Language Arts is at least an 87.  

Doing a project in a subject does help to reinforce that subject, so it's a great way for anyone to help their more challenging subject.  But, if you are doing great, and you want to have a good time showing off your "mad skills", go for it!

Share your ideas with us, let's make the coolest thing ever!


Here are the general dates:
  • Thursday, Feb. 14: Project Kickoff
  • Each Monday, a plan for the week on a planning website listing a reflection on a previous week as well as your plan for the following week.  Consider which Tech AKS you are going to address!!
  • Other tests and info will be posted here shortly.
  • LA- Quiz every Thursday and Friday over portions of the play we have read.
  • Romeo and Juliet Test- Thursday, March 7th and Friday, March 8th (study guides are in the CDAT9 shared drived under "Haddock")
  • LA County Interim- Monday, March 18
  • Wednesday, March 20 Project Due
Science AKS-
Chemistry-
Solutions-

14) analyze properties that describe solutions and the behavior of acids and bases (GPS, HSGT) (SCCH_B2005-14)

14a) explain solubility in terms of substances involved (i.e., solute, solvent) and the process of dissolving a solute by observing factors that affect the rate at which a solute dissolves in a specific solvent

14a1)  demonstrate that solubility is related to temperature by constructing a solubility curve

14a2) express concentrations in molarity,

14a3) prepare and properly label solutions of specified molar concentration

14a4) relate molality to colligative properties (GPS)
 
Acids and Bases-

14b) compare, contrast and evaluate the nature and behavior of acids and bases in terms of Arrhenius, Bronsted-Lowry Acids/Bases

14b1) compare, contrast and evaluate strong vs. weak acids/bases in terms of percent dissociation and conductivity

14b2) compare, contrast and evaluate the nature of acids and bases in terms of  Hydronium ion concentration and pH

14b3) compare, contrast and evaluate the nature and behavior of acids and bases in terms of acid-base neutralization

 
 
 
    14c) classify common substances as acid, base or neutral based on chemical properties
 
Biology Evolution-

12) evaluate the role of natural selection in the development of the theory of evolution (GPS, HSGT)

12a) trace the history of the theory (GPS)

12b) explain the history in terms of biodiversity, ancestry, and the rates of evolution (GPS)

12c) explain how fossil and biochemical evidence support the theory (GPS)

12d) relate natural selection to changes in species populations over time (GPS)

12e) examine modern evidence of micro-evolution as exhibited in biological resistance (pesticide and antibiotic resistance) (GPS)

 

 

Language Arts:

- cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as

inferences drawn from the text (CCGPS) (LA09_A2012-1/ELACC9-10

-determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text,

including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the

text (CCGPS) (LA09_A2012-2/ELACC9-10RL2)

-analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the

course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme (CCGPS)

(LA09_A2012-3/ELACC9-10RL3)

-determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and

connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g.,

how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone) (CCGPS)

(LA09_A2012-4/ELACC9-10RL4)

-analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel

plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise

(CCGPS) (LA09_A2012-5/ELACC9-10RL5)

-analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the

United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature (CCGPS) (LA09_A2012-6/ELACC9-10RL6)

-analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is

emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape

with the Fall of Icarus) (CCGPS) (LA09_A2012-7/ELACC9-10RL7)

-analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare

treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare)

(CCGPS) (LA09_A2012-8/ELACC9-10RL9)

-read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9–10 text complexity

band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range, by the end of grade 9 (CCGPS)

(LA09_A2012-9/ELACC9-10RL10)

 

 

 

Project 4 - Win That Contest!

posted Jan 14, 2013, 9:06 AM by Michael Reilly   [ updated Jan 15, 2013, 6:03 PM ]


The first project is exciting, it's real, and it's full of choices by YOU!
In groups of your choosing within your subgroup, you must choose a contest, and your project will be your contest entry.
Choices:
  1. StemChallenge, making a video game about science, and possibly winning laptops for your team -stemchallenge.org
  2. Emmy Awards - they have created a new high school recognition, you are the first school to hear about it!  Must be a video product.  Win recognition from the Emmy's!  Click here for the categories and rules.
  3. YouTube channel - you could own the playlist (and revenue!) from a set of Chemistry videos/animations on the Lanier CDAT YouTube Channel, which earns real money for advertising!
  4. Gwinnett Media Festival - CDAT students regularly do well here, especially if it's simple, high-quality work.  Click here for more information on this category.  (You can also enter previous projects for this, just for more entries!)
  5. Know of another contest to which you'd like to apply science?  If we approve it, go for it!
 


For your project, you will create a tool to express concepts in your science (Biology or Chemistry).  Individually, you will write a persuasive pitch for your project (that is, why someone should buy it).  

Technology to use (for the final project):  you can use any technology we've used so far this year.  We do not want any "traditional" techniques such as Powerpoint, etc., unless one of the technologies you've learned is a strong part of it. For example, some very cool Photoshop work demonstrated in Prezi. Also, for those who like Python, there's a field called "data sonification" that makes data or patterns into sound.  Hmm, could be cool!

You will be required to complete other assignments, quizzes, etc., during the this project as well.  See the General Timeline below for some of our expectations.
 
General Timeline (other dates will be added):
  • Kick Off -- Monday, January 14
  • Summary of team members, proposed topic, and desired contest -- Tuesday, January 15
  • Concept Map Due -- Wednesday, January 16 - rubric
  • Weekly plans on team website due each Friday, starting Jan. 18 - rubric
  • Due Date -- end of the day, Tuesday, February 5
  • Presentations-- Wednesday, February 6
 
Chemistry Unit Organizer including AKS (look down):

Chem Project 3 - Real Science

posted Oct 14, 2012, 12:32 PM by Michael Reilly   [ updated Dec 13, 2012, 10:39 AM ]

You can make a lot of money, do a lot of good, using knowledge, and sharing knowledge.  For example, a Kindergarten teacher in Georgia made $1 million selling her lessons online (click here).   The Green Brothers (John and Hank) are actually paid by Google for their YouTube channel "CrashCourse" (one estimate is $400,000 per year).  The point is: smart people can make a lot of money with all those brains (Bill Gates and Steve Jobs did okay too).  Learning can be a game too. And it does not have to be just like school, it can be common sense.  The movie "SuperSize Me" was about the effect McDonalds had on one guy (he invested $65,000, but the movie made $12,000,000).  And beyond money, how about doing something to fix the world? Or, what about REALcompetition, like the Emmy's? You can use your skills to make a difference, make a living.  You choose, both are good choices.

This project will last for most of the remainder of the semester.  (If you're a Biology student and still reading, time to go read the one for Biology, not Chemistry.)  After a week of "normal school" in which we will cover some basic info pretty quickly, you will have a 6-week project.  You will be focusing your Language Arts on research, nonfiction, and citation.  Chemistry will be focusing on the concept of Ionic and Covalent Bonding.  In Technology, you will learn about 3D graphics and animation using Autodesk 3DS Max. Even your PE/Health will overlap with topics.

In the first two weeks, from Oct. 22 to Nov. 2, we will cover the topics of bonding in Chemistry at a very rapid pace.  Those students who have a high class average (85+) will then be permitted to use that science time toward their projects.  On Nov. 2, teams will be selected for the remainder of the projects, in a process to be announced later.

Your product should be a non-fiction demonstration of chemical bonding.  It could be related to the educational or documentary examples listed above, or an experiment of your own.  While your team may not be experts after the first 2 weeks, you will have the information you need to generate ideas.

Check out the calendar below, so your team can plan appropriately.  

Timeline
  • October 15 - One-week review of the Periodic Table
  • October 15 and 16 - Language Arts classes to Media Center to learn online research tools
  • October 18 - Tech 3Ds Max Battlefield Tutorial Due | View Rubric
  • October 19 - Chem lab day
  • October 22 - Begin 2-week review of ionic and covalent bonding
  • October 23 - Tech: Snowman or other 3D figure model due  | View Requirements Here   | 3Ds Max Tutorials Here 
  • October 26 - Tech 3Ds Max 3D abstract scuplture due  | View Requirements Here   | 3Ds Max Tutorials Here 
  • October 29 and 30 - Language Arts online writing test
  • November 2 -  Chem lab day, team selection day - 
  • November 6 - Election Day Holiday
  • November 5 - Team members bring in individual project ideas, teams submit general outline for project
  • November 8 - Project outlines and proposals due - no product development until outline is approved
  • November 12 - Deliver storyboard and/or final plans.
  • November 12 and 13 - Language Arts online writing test
  • November 16 - Chem lab day
  • November 19 - Thanksgiving Vacation - Have a great week off!
  • December 5 - LA Performance Exam
  • December 11- LA County Final
  • December 14 - Projects and Technology Performance Final Exam due! | Technology Performance Final Exam Instructions

AKS

Technology 
(each student should review the AKS for their particular focus in Technology, include it on a team site for future reference)


Language Arts

20. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

20a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

20b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

20c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

20d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

20e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

21. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

21a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

21b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

21c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

21d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

21e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

21f. Use documents to clarify details or support claims.

21g. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).


CDAT9 Chem-

Bonding-

8b) predict f-

formulas for stable ionic compounds (binary and tertiary) based on balance of charges  (GPS)

8c) use IUPAC nomenclature for transition between the chemical names and formulas of ionic compounds (binary and tertiary), covalent compounds (binary, tertiary, and organic –alkanes), and acidic compounds (binary and tertiary) (GPS)

 

10f) compare and contrast types of chemical bonds (i.e., ionic, covalent – polar and nonpolar) (GPS)

Chemical Equations-

9) evaluate how the Law of Conservation of Matter is used to determine chemical composition in compounds and chemical reactions (GPS, HSGT) (SCCH_B2005-9)

9a) identify and balance the following types of equations:  synthesis (including condensation reactions that synthesize carbohydrates, and lipids, proteins), decomposition, single replacement, double replacement, and combustion (organic compounds)

9c) determine by experiment indicators of a chemical reaction (specifically: precipitation, gas evolution, water production, and changes in energy to the system) (GPS)

 

The following rubric will be used to grade your project.  It will count as your perofrmance final which is 5% of your final grade so follow the rubric well.

 

Summative Assessment Rubric

Standard / AKS

                                         

Scale  

1

Advanced 25 pts.

2

Proficient 20 pts

3

Developing 15 pts.

4

Limited 10 pts

5

Not attempted 0pts

 

3) read scientific materials to establish context for subject matter, develop vocabulary, and to be aware of current research (GPS, HSGT) (SCCH_A2005-7)

Team project successfully shows mastery of all aspects of the standard. A minimum of 5 references was used from reputable scientific sources.  Students incorporated documents into their project using current data to guide their inquiry.

Team project successfully shows an understanding of the standards.  3-4 references were used from reputable scientific sources.  Students attempted to incorporate documents into projects using current data to guide their inquiry.

Team project shows a mix of correct and incorrect information or demonstrates a partial understanding of the standard. 2-3 references were used and students only referred to them minimally.  References may also be older and information is out of date.

Team does not demonstrate an understanding of the standard. Less than 2 references were used which are old and inaccurate.  In addition, the information is not incorporated into the project.

No references were used.

10f) compare and contrast types of chemical bonds (i.e., ionic, covalent – polar and nonpolar) (GPS)

Team accurately identifies the types of bonds discussed in their project and correctly predicts their reactivity.

Team identifies the nature of the compounds discussed correctly and specifies their reactivity with 90-75% accuracy.

Team identifies compounds and their reactivity with an accuracy of 75-50%.

Team is less than 50% accurate in identifying the nature of compounds and their reactivity within their project.

AKS is not attempted

8c) use IUPAC nomenclature for transition between the chemical names and formulas of ionic compounds (binary and tertiary), covalent compounds (binary, tertiary, and organic –alkanes), and acidic compounds (binary and tertiary) (GPS)

 

Team names all compounds correctly.

Team is 90-75% accurate in naming all compounds.

Team names 75-50% of all compounds correctly

Team is less than 50% accurate in naming compounds

AKS is not attempted

 

It needs to be stated that the team projects are a collaboration between three teachers with their own AKS standards.  I have included my AKS standards only but this by no means the only standards student projects will be judged by.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CDAT9 Chem

Bio Project 3 - Real $cience

posted Oct 14, 2012, 11:43 AM by Michael Reilly   [ updated Dec 13, 2012, 10:38 AM ]

You can make a lot of money using knowledge, and sharing knowledge.  For example, a Kindergarten teacher in Georgia made $1 million selling her lessons online (click here).   The Green Brothers (John and Hank) are actually paid by Google for their YouTube channel "CrashCourse" (one estimate is $400,000 per year).  The point is: smart people can make a lot of money with all those brains (Bill Gates and Steve Jobs did okay too).    And it does not have to be just like school, it can be common sense.  The movie "SuperSize Me" was about the effect McDonalds had on one guy (he invested $65,000, but the movie made $12,000,000).

This project will last for most of the remainder of the semester.  (If you're a Chemistry student and still reading, time to go read the one for Chemistry, not Biology.)  In 2-week segments, we will cover major Biology topics.  In parallel, you will be focusing your Language Arts on research, nonfiction, and citation.  In technology, you will learn about 3D graphics and animation using Autodesk 3DS Max, and even your PE/Health will overlap with topics.

For each of the 4 major biology topics, you will create one cool tool that demonstrates that topic.  You will combine the series of 4 topics into one educational tool for others to learn from.  While you will be learning 3DS Max, you are not required to use it, you can choose to go back to music, Photoshop, video, etc.  This is NOT a fiction project, it's presenting real science, in a cool and meaningful way you determine.

Check out the calendar below, so you and your partner can plan appropriately.  This is going to be quick, so ask for help sooner rather than later!

Timeline
  • October 15 - Project begins
  • October 15 and 16 - Language Arts classes to Media Center to learn online research tools
  • October 18 - Tech: 3Ds Max Battlefield Tutorial due  | View Rubric
  • October 19 - Biology quiz on Biochemistry, bio lab day
  • October 22 - Project proposal due for Biochemistry topic 
  • October 24 - Tech: 3Ds Max Snowman model due View Requirements Here   | 3Ds Max Tutorials Here 
  • October 26 - Biology test on Biochemistry, Project final for Biochemistry topic, ech 3Ds Max Abstract Sculpture due.  
  • October 29 and 30 - Language Arts online writing test
  • November 2 - Biology quiz on "The Cell", bio lab day, Project draft due for "The Cell" topic
  • November 9 - Biology test on "The Cell", project final due for "The Cell" topic
  • November 12 and 13 - Language Arts online writing test
  • November 16 - Biology quiz on Cell Energetics, project proposal due for Cell Energetics topic, bio lab day
  • November 19 - Thanksgiving Vacation - Have a great week off!
  • November 30 - Test on Cell Energetics, project final due for Cell Energetics topic
  • December 4 - Literary Terms project due
  • December 5 - LA Performance Exam
  • December 7 - Biology quiz on Mitosis/Meiosis, project proposal due for this topic, bio lab day
  • December 11 - LA County Final
  • December 12 - Biology test on Mitosis/Meiosis 
  • December 14 - Technology Performance Final Exam  AND Mitosis/Meiosis Project due | Technology Performance Final Instructions 

                                                      
AKS
 
Biology

8) analyze the relationship between structures and functions in living cells (GPS, HSGT)

8a) state the cell theory

8b) describe the cell cycle

8c) identify common cell organelles and describe the function of each (e.g. diagrams and microscopic examinations)

8d) explain the role of cell organelles (including the cell membrane) in maintaining homeostasis and cell reproduction for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells (GPS)

8e) identify the elements that comprise living cells

8f) explain the impact of water in life processes (i.e. adhesion, cohesion, capillarity, density, and osmosis) (GPS)

8g) describe processes whereby substances enter and leave the cell (passive and active transport mechanisms)

8h) investigate factors that affect the rate of cellular transport (i.e. molecule size, charge, concentration, temperature)

8i) compare the reaction of plant and animal cells in solutions of different solute concentrations (i.e., isotonic, hypotonic, hypertonic solutions)

8j) explain how enzymes function as catalysts (GPS)

8k) describe the four basic types of organic macromolecules  (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) and their function in the cell (GPS)

8l) analyze and explain the storage and release of energy through the process of photosynthesis and respiration (GPS)

Technology
  • develop project concept proposal (GPS) (GTDD_D2006-16)
  • develop storyboards and/or thumbnails/roughs to communicate ideas (GPS) (GTDD_D2006-18)
  • develop flowchart/navigational blueprints (GPS) (GTDD_D2006-19)
  • write scripts (GPS) (GTDD_D2006-20)
  • combine media elements to produce an interactive multimedia project (QCC) (GTDD_D2006-21)
 
 

Language Arts

20. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

20a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

20b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

20c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

20d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

20e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

21. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

21a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

21b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

21c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

21d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

21e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

21f. Use documents to clarify details or support claims.

21g. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).



CDAT9 Biology Calendar


 
 

Project 2 - Man vs. Nature

posted Sep 11, 2012, 6:00 PM by Michael Reilly   [ updated Sep 12, 2012, 4:30 AM ]

 Project 2 begins Sept. 12, and should be fun!

We will be incorporating writing skills from Language Arts, your Biology and/or Chemistry topics, and your own recipe of technologies to develop the topic of "Man vs. Nature".  You will also include PE topics -identify aspects of fitness (cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility).  Your ending product is your creation combining visual and audio techniques to demonstrate your view of the battle between the human race and nature. 

This can be a local, national or global perspective.  While you are learning Photoshop, you can incorporate the video skills you previously acquired, and you need to add an audio component.  Also, you will be learning how to use Google Sites as a team sharing tool, and will be graded on your record-keeping and collaboration.  In addition to your multimedia product, you will be making a "movie poster" to represent your concept.

Finally, we are looking for improved depth on the topics:  don't just cover the standards by stating them, we want to see you weave the standards into a story.  Always tell a story, with a beginning, middle and end.  This can be a photo essay, a video with soundtrack, a rap song about a local situation with pictures; the story is up to you, but tell a story.

Some of the major dates, other assignments will be required during the project:
  1. Photoshop initial assignments due, 9/12
  2. Assign groups and establish group website, 9/17 (website shared with teachers and others)
  3. 3-5 page narrative for LA, Due Friday, 9/21 (more details from Ms. Haddock)
  4. MIDI sample work due 9/24
  5. Project outline due 9/26
  6. Science Unit exams 9/28
  7. Photoshop poster due 10/3
  8. Final Projects due 10/5

AKS (Standards)

Chemistry:
Biology:
Language Arts
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
  • Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events
  • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters
  • Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  • Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  • Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
  •  Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

  • Technology
    • use available graphics software programs (GPS, QCC) (GTDD_A2006-3)
    • create computer graphics (GPS, QCC) (GTDD_A2006-4)
    • demonstrate interactive media (GPS) (GTDD_C2006-14)
    • produce interactive media as a member of a development team (GPS) (GTDD_C2006-15)
    • communicate in a clear, concise and courteous manner (GPS) (GTDD_E2006-22)
    • identify problems, analyze alternative solutions and develop a plan of action (GPS) (GTDD_E2006-23)
    • use effective learning techniques to acquire and apply new knowledge and skills (GPS) (GTDD_E2006-24)
    • set goals and monitor progress toward meeting goals (QCC) (GTDD_E2006-25)
    • participate and interact as a team member and leader (GPS) (GTDD_E2006-26)

    Project 1 - "Science Academy Award"

    posted Jul 31, 2012, 7:01 PM by Michael Reilly   [ updated Sep 12, 2012, 4:30 AM ]

    There have been so many movies based on science throughout the years, from "The Blob" or "Frankenstein" to the modern "Hulk" and others.  Now it's your turn!
     
    While we don't expect you to make a Hollywood blockbuster (unless you secretly have $100 million funding and a talented crew), your first project will combine your science content and language arts skill, along with new video production techniques and team collaboration, to create a very short science "movie trailer" or "short".
     
     
     
     
     

    General Timeline

    • Aug. 6 - Day 1, we begin!
    • Aug. 7 - Project is begun.  You will have assignments from each teacher, each week.  Teachers do communicate with each other so your work is more efficient, but you need to stay on track.
    • See the items below for individual subject grades/dates and AKS to be covered.
    • Aug. 21 - Share Google site with group members and have all sections created.
    • Aug. 24 - Unit test for Science.
    • Aug. 30 - Projects are due.  No waiting, due at the beginning of the period, so you really want to aim for done by the 30th.

    AKS (Standards) 

    Chemistry:
    Biology:
    Language Arts:
    • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text 
    • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
    • Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
    • Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
    Technology:
    • use basic technical art skills (traditional and electronic) such as perspective to capture a focal point and create depth 
    • (GTDA_C2006-13) 
    • combine graphics, images, and sound for foundation or enrichment curricular projects (QCC) (GTDA_C2006-14) 
    • integrate the productivity tools including, but not limited to, word processor, database, spreadsheet, telecommunications, 
    • draw, paint, and utility programs into the digital graphics (QCC) (GTDA_C2006-15)

    Assignments

    Chemistry:
    • Textbook assignment in class.
    • Other
    Biology:
    • assignment
    • assignment
    Language Arts:
    • During Week 1, we will take a pre-test to see the extent of your Language Arts knowledge.
    • During Week 2, we will begin to read "The Birds" in the green literature book (p.50-82) and review the elements of a short story. We will also look at a few non-fiction articles to discover what happens when nature goes wild!
    • During Week 3, we will read an excerpt from The Perfect Storm and recognize the different forms of conflict. We will continue to read non-fiction articles that describe unpredictable events in nature.
    • You will have 3-4 quizzes over our reading as well as a final test.
    • After we have finished our readings, you will construct your own short stroy following the guidelines of the plot pyramid. Your short story must be completely original, typed, and 3-5 pages long.

    Technology:

    • During Week 1, you will learn the basics of Google Apps.  You will login, send me an email telling me that you got in.  The subject of the email should say "I got in", the body text should have your name.
    • Staring at the middle of Week 1, and into Week 2: visit http://tv.adobe.com/show/learn-premiere-pro-cs5/ and learn the Premier Pro Getting Started videos (skip #5, just watch the first 2).  After watching and practicing these, you should ALL be able to record, import, edit (chop, cut), add transitions, add titles and export a movie.  This is due Friday, 8/10/12.  Save it to show to me, each person should have their own.  
    • Then, move on to the special effects software, After Effects, and review the Getting Started videos at http://tv.adobe.com/show/learn-after-effects-cs5/.  Using the movie you edited in Premier Pro, add 3 special effects, and export a final video to a playable version (i.e., wmv, mp4, etc.).  I highly recommend you watch these WITH someone, practice them WITH someone, then make individual products.  This is due Wednesday, 8/15/12.
    • You will start your actual projects around Week 2, and more dates will be set then.  Your final project movie is due 8/30/12.

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